A Peu de Museu (The Museum in the Street) is an invitation to explore the streets of Cervera from a new perspective. With technology, in the shape of a mobile phone, you can participate in the stories of three women living at three crucial moments in the city's history.
Their voices will accompany you on your journey as you visit the town's historic sites and buildings, and they will reveal what is hidden inside. If you follow all the routes, you will witness some events from the past, as if at first hand, and form a view of Cervera as a town in constant transformation.

3 ROUTES, 3 STORIES, 3 WOMEN

My name is Margarida, Menarguens’ slave. I have two sons. The first from an unknown father, at least that’s how it was registered so his name wouldn’t become public, but I certainly know who he was. I baptised him with the name of Pere on 21 April 1434 at the church of Santa Maria. My second son was born three years later in the middle of summer and he was baptised on 12 July. On that occasion the priest agreed to register the name of the father: the teacher Gauter, a public notary by profession and good friend of my master, and now of the boy's too!

 
My name is Regina and I married Issach de Quercí, son of Issach de Quercí senior, Jacob’s brother. Everything has gone badly since my husband died. We had no male heir to continue the family name and that means, according to our laws, that I’m obliged to marry my brother-in-law Jacob. He has fled to the barony of Anglesola because he doesn’t want to… and as for me, nobody has asked me what I think! The Quercís have had to turn to the chancellery of king Joan II to enforce the marriage or otherwise leave me free by means of halizah. Although neither option is satisfactory, they have decided to grant me liberty.

 
I’m Ignàsia Brach, but everyone knows me as Nasa Tabaco. I run an inn in the Carrer Major in Cervera, popular with university students and lots of other young people around the area. In my family there are renowned authorities connected with the university and they know exactly what my inn represents: a place of liberty within the rigid Cervera university regime. Despite the frequent disputes among this young crowd I like to think they feel at home in my inn because I provide services and games not everyone else can – I’ve brought the city’s first billiard table from Barcelona!